AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A heroin addicted lies in his bed in the detoxification room at the NEJAT Centre in Kabul, a non-governmental organisation which helps rehabilitate Afghan drug addicts, some who are HIV positive, on  April 24, 2012. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A drug addicted looks out of a window at  the detoxification room at the NEJAT Centre in Kabul, a non-governmental organization which helps rehabilitate Afghan drug addicts, some who are HIV positive, on  April 24, 2012. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A heroin addicted washes himself at the NEJAT Centre in Kabul, a non-governmental organisation which helps rehabilitate Afghan drug addicts, some who are HIV positive, on  April 24, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A youth opium addicted sits on a bench at the NEJAT Centre in Kabul, a non-governmental organisation which helps rehabilitate Afghan drug addicts, some who are HIV positive, on  April 24, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A heroin addicted, who is clean his second day dances to music in the resident room at the NEJAT Centre in Kabul, a non-governmental organisation which helps rehabilitate Afghan drug addicts, some who are HIV positive, on  April 25, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A drug addict smokes  heroin under a bridge near the Kabul River on  April 26, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE
AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  A drug addict walks with a heroin syringe in his arm at a waste water canal on April 25, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  Afghan girls look at drug addicts use heroin and other narcotics  at a waste water canal on April 26, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE AFGHANISTAN-SOCIETY-DRUGS-NEJAT CENTER  Blood and two heroine syringes are pictured near the Kabul River on  April 25, 2012 in Kabul. Between 2005 and 2009, the number of Afghan heroin addicts tripled to 150,000, according to the United Nations, with 230,000 people now using opium Afghanistan grows about 90 percent of the world's opium, says the UN drugs and crime office UNODC. It estimates that export earnings last year from Afghan opiates were worth $2.4 billion -- equivalent to 15 per cent of GDP.  AFP PHOTO/ JOHANNES EISELE